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We've partnered with LightStream to bring you a low-interest loan on the tiny home you want.

All lending services are provided by LightStream, a division of SunTrust Bank, and we may be compensated by LightStream through links on this site.

 

Have you found the tiny home you want? Then it's time to set up your financing.

When you have good to excellent credit, you've earned a low rate on tiny home loan from our financing partner LightStream, the nation's premier online consumer lender and a division of SunTrust Bank.

With a LightStream loan, you can finance any tiny home you want. Here's what else you can expect with a LightStream loan:

LightStream will even plant a tree once your loan is funded!

Apply Now

“I have to say, I am blown away at how easy this was to complete. You weren't kidding when you said it's guaranteed the easiest loan process ever. I thought dealing with our credit union in the past was easy, but this takes it to a whole different level.”
— J.W. from Bee Cave, TX


I have a confession to make: I can’t draw. At least I can’t draw architecture by hand. I can’t sketch out lovely elevations and I certainly can’t sketch perspectives from my head like real architects. I never fully developed the skill in architecture school, then went on to grad school where I studied preservation. At that point, and for most of my career after, I didn’t need to hand draw designs in order to work on historic buildings; I had to measure what was existing, enter it into CAD, then work on space planning from there. I’ve gotten good at it, and good at adding architectural details that have gone missing, all in hard lined 2-D CAD. Similarly, I have had no problem designing directly in CAD for our sheds, garage and cottages since the footprint is limited by our build/ delivery constraints and I can space plan in plan much in the way I worked on historic home remodels prior to starting Historic Shed. And boxes aren't all that hard to visualize.

2-D elevation of an existing historic home drawn in AutoCad

That said, I have always looked wistfully at nicely rendered drawings in 3-D, hand sketched or drawn in computer modeling programs. I, however, have always drawn/designed in 2-D AutoCad which doesn’t allow you to create those nice images (CAD programs were fairly new when I attended school in the late 80s, early 90s). I am very good at AutoCad (I even taught it at a tech college years ago) and can create good construction drawings in fairly quick time, but AutoCad is limited to 2-D and can be hard for people to visualize when you are showing them how their cottage will be laid out.

I’ve been struggling with this for years. I pride myself on being pretty computer literate (although I will say I’ve gotten lazy since I have a teenage son that I can turn to for IT) so have spent a lot of time exploring various options to create 3-D renderings, convinced I can learn a new system. I tried SketchUp in the early years, and then again at various intervals, but found it didn’t work with my CAD-trained brain. I tried several other programs, all with similar results: tried them for a couple of days, got frustrated, and then went back to my comfort zone pumping out AutoCad drawings. One of these trials was Revit, which I had bought as part of a package deal with my last AutoCad update (2015). I tried it at the time, then let it sit on my computer unused for several years. About four months ago I decided that I was going to put the time and effort in and learn Revit once and for all. So I watched training videos and I followed step by step hands-on training every evening for months. In the end, I could draw a basic building, but found it difficult to draw certain items that are standard to our Historic Shed designs, such as exposed rafter tails. When, after months of seriously trying, I found my 3-D images constrained by the computer program and the steep uphill learning curve, I starting looking around again.

This time I re-stumbled upon SoftPlan, a residential design program that I had purchased years before, but which wasn’t really right for the work I had been involved in at the time (a project that involved relocating and renovating 33 historic buildings). Now that I was working on new construction residential projects 90% of the time, it seemed worth trying out again. I downloaded the trial, starting playing around and found that it didn’t have the issues I had run into before with other programs. So I bought the online subscription upgrade. I have now been at it most evenings for about a month, received some free training from the company, and am feeling very confident that I will soon be turning out 3-D drawings, along with construction drawings, that will work for us. At some point, I may find it's not everything I need, but for now, I am very pleased at how quickly I have been learning it and by the powerful built in framing and materials take off tools.

Here are some of my attempts at drawing our Ponce model, one of my favorite floor plans. They still have a ways to go, but I definitely see potential!

Look for some new designs in full 3-D soon.

Ponce model floor plan, 3-D model, and interior

More than a few years ago (2011 to be exact), I wrote a post about historic detached carports and included some designs of our own that we thought would be fun to build and useful in a variety of situations. Like many of my random design exercises, none of the sketches were built, until now. And I must say that it looks even better in real life than in my head.

A customer in the oldest city in the US, St. Augustine contacted us and was interested in replacing a rather rickety open garage behind her new-to-her 1920s bungalow. We started with some garage designs, but didn't find the right solution until we dusted off the carport/ shed sketches and found something that fit both the site and the customer's needs.

The existing garage had seen better days.

The main house is a wonderful shingled-sided gable bungalow with a shed dormer.

The design for the new building created half storage shed and half covered parking area, with elements that match the main house, like eave brackets and exposed rafter tails.

Building the carport shed in our shop in Brooksville.

Historic Shed built the new carport shed on the same footprint as the old garage, which is adjacent to an alley.

The building is 20' wide, with half used for locked storage and half for covered parking.

The yard side of the shed has a single door for access to the storage.

The carport ceiling has tongue and groove v-joint wood.

Eave brackets complement the main house.

The Historic Shed Carport Shed is a nice alternative to a fully enclosed garage or a standard shed, providing both covered parking and storage.

We are now offering plans for the Carport Shed for sale online for the DIYer or those not located in Florida: Carport Shed Construction Plans

Historic Shed recently was able to put its mark on our own Hernando County by building a new 8'x8' parking attendant shed for the Pine Island Beach Park. While Hernando County is located directly on the Gulf of Mexico, there are few public beaches, with Pine Island Park offering the only sandy Gulf beach. Therefore our little shack will be seen by many residents and visitors to Hernando County, particularly as Florida winter weather attracts northerners in the next couple of months. The island history is important in Hernando County history and some interesting background on the island and surrounding area can be read here in the Hernando Sun.

The Gulf is very shallow off Hernando County and while Pine Island is beautiful, it is more a wading beach than a swimming beach.

The birds really like the beach at Pine Island. I take a photo of the footprint patterns nearly every time I go there.

Here are some of the beach footprint makers: Black Skimmers

 

The small shed was placed on a concrete slab and the interior will be finished out by the county. The layout allows the parking attendant to take in the parking fee, while enjoying  cool air from a ClimateRight 5000 BTU unit. The vibrant colors were chosen by County staff, who clearly had a really good time making their choices. The colors will compliment a new fence and playground equipment that are part of the overall park upgrades.

The shed's vibrant colors now greet all visitors to the park. The cypress shutters are operable and allow the windows to be secured after hours and during storms. Hooks hold them open so that breezes won't slam them shut.

Flood vents are located on two sides of the shed as it is located within a flood zone.

Shutters closed and latched. This is what shutters are designed to do.

The batten shutters really make a nice accent on the shed, as well as being functional.

We design a lot of custom sheds that complement historic bungalows, but most are commonly covered with lap or novelty siding. Recently we got a chance to built a slightly differently clad shed for a unique 1940s bungalow in New Port Richey. The house, and an existing garage on the lot are both covered completely in wood shingles, so we designed the new shed accordingly.

The cedar shingles made the shop smell so good!

Walls up and roof dried in.

The shed is designed for use as a workshop with a small door for every day use and a large one for bigger items. The windows on the side are double-hung, meaning that the top slides down and the bottom slides up.

The front gable elevation has a vent that matches the main house.

Shed details showing 1x6 roof sheathing, cedar shingle siding, awning windows and traditional trim.

The shed nestled in the yard.

Like our fellow Florida residents, we have been extra busy and anxious regarding Hurricane Irma for the past couple of weeks. With images from Hurricane Harvey's impacts in Texas fresh in our minds, and constant news of the large size and tremendous wind speed of Irma, we were glued to the weather forecasts showing it heading up the east coast, or the middle of the state, or to our Gulf coast side, and being told it was going to impact us no matter where it hit Florida. The only questions in our minds were whether we expected three or twelve shingles to remain on our roof, and ankle deep or thigh deep flooding.

Along with constantly checking the forecast, first there was prepping our existing jobs for the impending storm (we currently have a large shingle-sided shed installation, a garage apartment and a historic renovation in Brooksville going on), then cleaning up our shop and boarding our home, which is located within a flood zone and ended up under mandatory evacuation orders, which we heeded.

The Historic Shed shop turned into too big of a project to prepare the way we'd like for the storm which has been a big lesson for us for future threats. We've nearly outgrown the shop building we've been in since 2007 and so we've had to store materials and equipment outside the main metal building. We have been building entire sheds outside under the front covered area and space is at a premium. Clean up pre-storm required removing a lot of cut-offs from siding to roof panels - things can really accumulate when you don't stay on top of it - and trying to fit all the things that had moved outside the building back inside. Since school was cancelled for hurricane days, we even made our kids help get things ready. We made great progress, but weren't as confident as we would have liked prior to the storm's arrival that things would say put in the projected high winds.

Luckily, Hurricane Irma dropped to a Category 2 or even a 1 by the time it reached us here in Brooksville and we suffered no serious damage at our location and no items blew away (however, the City of Brooksville had lots of downed trees). The biggest hurdle has been not having any electricity at the shop since the storm, which makes it impossible to get much done in this age of power tools and internet communication, but it has also given us time to do necessary clean-up at the shop and at home. I think people with no AC and water in their homes are a bit more important than our shop anyway, so we have no problem being patient.

The display shed we keep out in front of the shop came through with flying colors and we have heard from several of our customers who have let us know that their sheds, garages, and cottages had no damage as well. We know that at least three cottages were occupied throughout the storm, each located in diverse areas of the state. The one exception was from an owner whose shed we installed just this summer on Anna Maria Island who sent a photo of a 2" wide stick that penetrated his roof. It's seeing things like this that make you realize the force of the winds during the storm.

We very much hope that each and every one of you impacted by the storm are safe and have had minimal damage. And that you have recovered from the anxiety as well.

This stick went though both the metal roof and the sheathing below. It's a bit scary to see this impact!

It seems like you can't look at social media sites lately without seeing something about She Sheds, or accessory buildings designed for women to gather, create, relax, or escape for some solitude. Even the Today Show had a segment the other day about these accessory buildings designed as refuges for women. In our case, we have been asked to build She Shed type sheds for many uses, from artist studios to entertaining spaces. The buildings have been varied, the designs fun, and the women we've met have been incredibly interesting.

"You can't use up creativity. The more you use, the more you have." - Maya Angelou

Here's some examples:

Mid Century Modern Home Office Shed

Artists Shed in Citrus County

Sarasota Artist Studio Shed

A Sunny Artist Studio Shed

Studio Shed in St. Petersburg

Lake Eola Heights Shed

Last fall we were approached by a woman who was interested in building a cottage in her son's back yard in St. Petersburg. We looked through the local zoning regulations and found that the property allowed for Accessory Living Units (ALUs), but not Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs). The difference between the two in St. Petersburg zoning was that she could build a cottage, but would not be allowed to have a full kitchen with an oven. Other areas of St. Petersburg, mostly in the historic neighborhoods closer to downtown, do allow full cottages with full kitchens (ADUs).

When considering a secondary dwelling behind an existing home (carriage house, in law suite, granny pod, guest cottage, rental cottage, etc.), always check local zoning regulations first as it will tell you if you can build an accessory dwelling unit, if it can have a kitchen, where it can placed (setbacks), and if there are any size limitations. Most communities have their zoning regulations available online at: https://library.municode.com/fl and offer a myriad of information on what can be built where.

For this project, we adapted our 14'x16' Starlet Cottage plan for our customer's use, turning the kitchenette area into a walk-in closet and adding a roof extension over the front door to create a porch seating area. The end result is a comfortable and nicely appointed cottage. See details here, although the closet and bath ultimately were reversed: Starlet Cottage Plan In addition to meeting the zoning requirements, the cottage meets all Florida Building Codes and is legal for full time living.

The front gable roof was extended to 4' to create a covered seating area.

The 224 sf cottage is set on a concrete slab so she wouldn't have to deal with stairs.

The cottage interior under construction - bath on the right, closet on the left, storage loft above.

Historic Shed Tiny House Interior

The front area of the cottage is an open room with cathedral ceiling and a storage shelf along the top of the wall.

A small seating area fits nicely along the side wall. The flooring is ceramic tile with a weathered wood look.

While the cottage was not allowed a stove/ oven, there is room for a small refrigerator and microwave.

Tiny House Bath

The bath meets Florida Building Code requirements and includes a nice sized shower. A tankless water heater is located in the adjacent closet.

The cottage was designed with a windowless wall so that the owner could install this lovely Tuscany scene.

Once the landscaping goes in, this custom Starlet Cottage will be quite pleasant.

Historic Shed now offer the Starlet Cottage as a shell-only package with all required architectural plans: https://historicshed.com/cottage-packages/

The shed that gets the most "oohs" and "aahs" when we are out at shows is definitely the Snack Shack we built in Palm Harbor a few years ago. Painted in  fun colors, it conjures up sunny days with umbrella adorned drinks in hand. With our latest Coastal Breeze Snack Shack, I think we have another ideal tropical back yard, and this one is available as a vacation rental.

Installing theHistoric Shed Snack Shack

Installing the Coastal Breeze Snack Shack

Bar openings

The bar features two awning shutters that open for cocktail hour. The front 4' of the shed is used for the bar, the rear is for storage. The bar has a 4' covered porch deck.

Pub Shed by Pool

The 12'x14' Snack Shack Pub Shed nestles nicely by the pool.

Pub shed in pool area

A view from the yard looks rather inviting.

Tropical Shed

The shed is designed to complement the house and the yard.

Pub Shed Bar Opening

The homeowners had to make sure it worked. The inside of the bar was finished with tongue and groove pine.

Pub Shed

12'x14' Historic Shed Snack Shack Shed ready for company!

1212 Ponce de Leon Boulevard
Brooksville, FL 34601
813-333-2249
design@historicshed.com

Licensed & Insured 
FL CBC1258207
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